‘Charlotte’s Web’ by E.B. White

One thing I love about pubs in Bristol is the abundance of books. All right, not everywhere, but in most places you get a swap-library, which is just brilliant!

At least, it would be, if I were one to swap. Unfortunately, I am not so keen on abandoning a dear friend on a shelf, replacing it with one that’s only better because I haven’t read it.

Therefore, I have to apologize to a couple of pubs in Bristol, for having lessened their collection of at least one title. The one in particular I’m talking about today is ‘Charlotte’s web’.

Now tell me, what would you do if you find this little jewel standing on a shelf, half eaten by woodworm and desperately seeking attention? I acted on instinct and brought it home with me.

I couldn’t leave it if I tried.

After a couple of month, in a moment when I desperately needed to get a grip on reality, I picked it up and it played its magic, bringing me to a place where even something as tiny as a spider could make the difference.

Now to the story.

Wilbur is a spring pig, born too tiny and destined to be killed hours from being born, if only little Fern hadn’t run to stop his father, begging him to spare the piglet and let her raise him.

Unfortunately, pigs have the tendency to grow in size and after a while it becomes rather difficult to keep Wilbur in Fern’s house. Therefore, he has to move to the Uncle’s farm.

There, nobody is particularly friendly to Wilbur and he grows quite unhappy, until one day a tiny voice calls for him and a big, hairy spider appears. Her name is Charlotte and she’s a blood-thirsty fly-killer.

With Charlotte around, it all goes very well for Wilbur, until one day he’s told what a dreadful fate he’s facing: the Christmas Roast.

Wilbur quickly goes into panic, but Charlotte is there to help. The tiniest being in the farm, who only knows how to spun webs and kill flies, will stand up to the challenge for Wilbur’s life.

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2 Comments

    1. Thanks! I’m glad you would have done the same thing!
      It’s good to know that books can still hope for a good soul to take them away from dim pubs and lead them to undiscovered shelves… 😀

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