‘Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang’ by Emma Thompson

Everybody knows, therefore loves, Emma Thompson. After all, we’re only human.

You probably know her for winning two Academy Awards (Best Non-Original Screenplay for Sense and Sensibility and Best Leading Actress for Howard’s End) and many many BAFTA, as well as for her subtle fixation – we call it dedication – with Jane Austen and English classics.

Or simply for playing P.L. Travers in her last film Saving Mr Banks.

Her humor and wit are so fiercely captivating that it’s almost impossible not to laugh any time you see her – mostly because it’s probably her main intent from the start, to make you laugh.

Well then, guess what I thought when I found ‘Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang’, the story told by Emma Thompson, along with a diary of the days of filming (the film came out in 2010).

I was already familiar with Nanny McPhee (small c, big P), who looks horrible when she arrives, absolutely with no warning, preferably during a lightning storm.

She’s a nanny with a magic cane, who comes with a jackdaw who suffers from collywabbles because of all the window putty he eats.

Nanny McPhee works by the oddest of rules and soon Mrs Green, her three children and the two snobbish cousins will have to come to terms with it: “When you need her but don’t want her, then she must stay; when you want her but no longer need her, then she must go.”

With Mr Green away to fight the war and his brother Phil insisting for Mrs Green to sell the farm she lives in and that belonged to the Green family for generations; between flying piglet and UXB (Unexploded Bomb; beware, it might go off any moment) the situation gets quickly from dramatic to tragic.

Don’t panic, though.

Is coming Nanny McPhee (small c, big P).

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If you want to know more about this book: Goodreads

If you want to read this book: Amazon

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